Open Source Repository

Home /spring/spring-beans-3.0.5 | Repository Home


org/springframework/beans/factory/access/BeanFactoryLocator.java
/*
 * Copyright 2002-2007 the original author or authors.
 *
 * Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
 * you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
 * You may obtain a copy of the License at
 *
 *      http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
 *
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
 * distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
 * WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
 * See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
 * limitations under the License.
 */

package org.springframework.beans.factory.access;

import org.springframework.beans.BeansException;

/**
 * Defines a contract for the lookup, use, and release of a
 {@link org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanFactory},
 * or a <code>BeanFactory</code> subclass such as an
 {@link org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext}.
 *
 <p>Where this interface is implemented as a singleton class such as
 {@link SingletonBeanFactoryLocator}, the Spring team <strong>strongly</strong>
 * suggests that it be used sparingly and with caution. By far the vast majority
 * of the code inside an application is best written in a Dependency Injection
 * style, where that code is served out of a
 <code>BeanFactory</code>/<code>ApplicationContext</code> container, and has
 * its own dependencies supplied by the container when it is created. However,
 * even such a singleton implementation sometimes has its use in the small glue
 * layers of code that is sometimes needed to tie other code together. For
 * example, third party code may try to construct new objects directly, without
 * the ability to force it to get these objects out of a <code>BeanFactory</code>.
 * If the object constructed by the third party code is just a small stub or
 * proxy, which then uses an implementation of this class to get a
 <code>BeanFactory</code> from which it gets the real object, to which it
 * delegates, then proper Dependency Injection has been achieved.
 *
 <p>As another example, in a complex J2EE app with multiple layers, with each
 * layer having its own <code>ApplicationContext</code> definition (in a
 * hierarchy), a class like <code>SingletonBeanFactoryLocator</code> may be used
 * to demand load these contexts.
 *
 @author Colin Sampaleanu
 @see org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanFactory
 @see org.springframework.context.access.DefaultLocatorFactory
 @see org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext
 */
public interface BeanFactoryLocator {

  /**
   * Use the {@link org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanFactory} (or derived
   * interface such as {@link org.springframework.context.ApplicationContext})
   * specified by the <code>factoryKey</code> parameter.
   <p>The definition is possibly loaded/created as needed.
   @param factoryKey a resource name specifying which <code>BeanFactory</code> the
   <code>BeanFactoryLocator</code> must return for usage. The actual meaning of the
   * resource name is specific to the implementation of <code>BeanFactoryLocator</code>.
   @return the <code>BeanFactory</code> instance, wrapped as a {@link BeanFactoryReference} object
   @throws BeansException if there is an error loading or accessing the <code>BeanFactory</code>
   */
  BeanFactoryReference useBeanFactory(String factoryKeythrows BeansException;

}